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6 foods to eat for healthier hair

Did you know that certain foods can promote healthy hair? Just like our skin, our hair requires a regular supply of key nutrients. Here are some foods that can contribute to the health of your hair and scalp.

Eggs: These small packages are packed with protein and biotin, which are essential for growing healthy hair. They are also a good source of zinc, selenium and other nutrients that help to deliver strong shiny hair.

Berries: Sweet and tasty, berries are also packed with antioxidants and vitamins that can help to encourage hair growth. Acai berries & strawberries for example, are rich in vitamin C, which is a co-factor in collagen production and iron absorption, two elements that can encourage hair growth. 

Red meat: Red meat, chicken and fish provide iron that is easily absorbed by the body. Because the hair follicle and root receive nutrients via the blood, if iron levels are low the nutrient supply to the follicle is affected, which can interrupt the hair growth cycle and result in hair loss. 

Salmon and sardines: Fatty fish are a great source of Omega 3 fats, which are found in cells that line the scalp, where they help to keep the scalp and hair hydrated. Our bodies can’t make Omega 3s though, so we need to get them from our diet. If you don’t like seafood, you can get your Omega 3s from chia seeds, flax seeds, nuts (walnuts are especially good), and leafy vegetables.

Sweet potato: Orange sweet potatoes are loaded with beta-carotene, which the body turns into vitamin A, which then encourages hair growth. Vitamin A also helps the body to make sebum, an oily substance created by our hairs sebaceous glands, providing a natural conditioner for a healthy scalp. 

Collagen: In a study done in 2012, on women with thinning hair, supplementing with collagen for 90 days was reported to improve hair volume, scalp coverage and thickness. After 180 days, hair shine also appeared to get better, along with skin smoothness and skin moisture retention. For more details, see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3509882/ .




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